What is the Best Drill for Mixing Mud ? Our Top Models For 2018

Best Drill for Mixing Mud

If you are a contractor or DIY expert, you know that creating walls from scratch is a tough and rigorous process. That is why you need the best drill for mixing mud. A drill for mixing mud will make it necessary for you to create walls made out of drywall, concrete, mortar, or another strong material. While you are on the topic of shopping for drills for mixing mud, be sure that you also get a capable mixing paddle along with it.

In this review, we will be looking at 5 great drills for mixing mud, from brands such as Makita, Bosch and DeWalt. We will allow you to see what makes each drill great, as well as what about these drills needing improvement. We will show you the drill for mixing mud that we like the best at the end of our review.

Comparison of Top 5 Drill for Mixing Mud

Product Name

Max RPM

Voltage

Drill Chuck

Price

Makita DS4012 Spade Handle Drill, 1/2-Inch

600

110

½ inches

DEWALT DW130V 9 Amp 1/2-Inch Drill with Spade [Editors Choice]

550

120

½ inches

Bosch GBM9-16 9 Amp 5/8" Mixer

700

120

⅝ inches

Genesis GSHD1290 1/2" 9.0 Amp Variable Speed

850

120

½ inches

F2C Pro 1600W Adjustable 7 Speed Handheld [Editors Choice]

700

110

N/A

The 5 Best Drill for Mixing Mud Reviews for 2018!

1. Makita DS4012 Spade Handle Drill, 1/2-Inch

Makita is a well-known brand in construction and home improvement, and they have drill for mixing mud to offer us here. To extend the life of the drill, it has an all ball bearing construction.

This drill is housed with a 8.5 amp motor and variable speed control. The power and control are both there, so it is not rocket science for you to be able to choose one over the other with this drill. The voltage is reportedly 110.

The speeds that you can drill at vary from zero to 600 rotations per minute. You can use this drill to mix mud and a bevy of other materials. A reverse trigger is also included, allowing you to drill in the opposite direction, if need be.

Makita DS4012 Spade Handle Drill, 1/2-Inch

This is a lightweight drill, only weighing six pounds, which is great for when the users needs to hold it for extended periods of time.

The spade handle allows the drill to rotate at a full 360 degrees with 24 detent stops, allowing you to find the best position every time.

With the purchase of this drill, you get a solid one-year warranty. If you ever find anything wrong with it within the first year, you could be eligible to get it replaced for free.

The caveat to this drill is that the handle is not professionally bound to it. You have a couple of screwed and that’s it. Over time, the screws may rust and deteriorate and the handle becomes looser and less secure. We would have appreciated a more stable handle, especially for a drill for mixing mud.

Pros:

  • Has a variable speed control.
  • Has a high horsepower motor
  • Is light in weight.
  • Rotates at 360 degrees.
  • Comes with a one-year warranty.
  • Has a high RPM.

Cons:

  • Handle is weak and insecure.

2. DEWALT DW130V 9 Amp 1/2-Inch Drill with Spade Handle

Arguably the king of home improvement, DeWalt offers up their drill for mixing mud in their signature yellow and black colors.

Like Makita’s drill, the DW130V offers variable speed control with a directional toggle, so you can spin the drill in a counterclockwise direction if you so choose to do that. The maximum RPM is 500, fifty rotations less than Makita’s drill.

Even though the product name is the DW130V, it is actually a 120-volt motor, which is still enough for powerful drilling for any type of project. You can use this drill to mix drywall mud, paint and more.

This is a 7.5-pound drill that while slightly heavy, it still is comfortable to hold. The handle is ergonomically designed to fit naturally into your hands. The grip on the handle is soft and supple for long period of little fatigue.

DEWALT DW130V 9 Amp 1/2-Inch Drill with Spade Handle

There are two handles, aside from the rear spade handle to grip, so you can drill in the most comfortable way possible for you. The spade handle allows the drill to rotate at a full 360 degrees, so there is no need to start and stop.

Like most DeWalt products, this is a professionally made drill that feels like a strong tool that can last for a long time. As far as customer support goes, you get a three-year warranty, a 90-day money back guarantee, and a one-year “free service contract”.

The problem with this drill for mixing mud is that it is very loud. While you should expect all power tools and drill to be loud, this one sounds like a jackhammer. In comparison, Makita’s drill is significantly quieter, and does not require you to wear ear buds or headphones while mixing your mud.

Pros:

  • Has a variable speed control.
  • Has a high horsepower motor.
  • Rotates at 360 degrees.
  • Comes with a three-year warranty.
  • Has a 90-day money back guarantee.

Cons:

  • Is very loud.

3. Bosch GBM9-16 9 Amp 5/8" Mixer

Bosch is another widely trusted name in power tools, and their colors are deep steel blue, red and grey. Unlike Makita and DeWalt’s drills for mixing mud, the key chuck on this drill is five eighths inches.

Its 9-amp motor is powerful and resilient, which can be used for mixing all kinds of substances from epoxy resins to paints, mud for drywall and cement plaster.

The keyed chuck is slightly wider than other drills, allowing it to accept more accessories and drill bits than usual. If you have drill bits that are just too wide for your current drill, this drill from Bosch is sure to take them.

The handle is much like the handles from the previous two drills; it allows you to rotate the drill at 360 degrees and gives you the best way to hold the drill.

Bosch GBM9-16 9 Amp 5/8 Mixer

The highest RPM attainable is 700. With variable speed control, you can get a slower RPM if you so choose, but 700 RPM is a lot to work with and can help speed up any tasks. This drill has a slow startup feature to prevent splatters when working with liquids and semi-liquids.

The warranty for this drill for mixing mud lasts for one year. If it were to fail within the first year that you bought it, you have the opportunity to get a new one by sending your old one back to Bosch.

The downside to this drill is that there is no way to lock the 360 degree handle. With every mix or drill you do, you will need to hold it as still as possible for the lack of locking features. Considering that other drills include locks on theirs, this is one big disadvantage that Bosch’s drill here has.

Pros:

  • Comes with a one-year warranty.
  • Has a high RPM.
  • Has a variable speed control.
  • Has a high horsepower motor.
  • Rotates at 360 degrees.

Cons:

  • Handle does not lock.

4. Genesis GSHD1290 1/2" 9.0 Amp Variable Speed

This next drill for mud mixing is from Genesis. They offer a more affordable model that can match other competitors stat for stat, if not better. This drill for mixing mud comes in a die cast aluminum shell.

Let’s start with the RPM, you can drill from zero to 850. The variable speed dial on the trigger gives you the proper speed you need for each project. The motor is as powerful as nine amps.

You get a spade and side handle for proper and comfortable control of your drills and mixes. You can use this drill to mix mud and paint with simplicity. The lock on button ensures that your brill will never move as you are working.

With the purchase of this drill, you get a two-year warranty. You have plenty of time to use this drill in a frequent manner to determine if it is a genuine product or a defect.

Genesis GSHD1290 1/2 9.0 Amp Variable Speed

This drill, however, cannot last a very long time. With the high power it offers at an affordable price, we do not really trust it to outlast most professionally made power tools. You may have heard the name “Genesis” before, but they are nowhere near the quality provided by DeWalt. And unfortunately, warranties do not cover wear-and-tear, so do not assume that you can just pay once and own a Genesis forever.

Pros:

  • Is affordable.
  • Comes with a two-year warranty.
  • Has a high RPM.
  • Has a variable speed control.
  • Has a high horsepower motor.
  • Rotates at 360 degrees.

Cons:

  • May not last that long.

5. F2C Pro 1600W Adjustable 7 Speed Handheld

This last drill for mixing muds is one that mixes in the traditional sense, so it’s not that gun-shaped tool that you would notice with the other drills. It is an affordable product, and it is made specifically for mixing, and not drilling too.

What is interesting about this drill is that the speeds are set in seven different settings. The “max” setting spins the drill bit at 700 RPM. The “min” setting will spin it at just 180 RPM.

The handle is ergonomically designed, and both of your hands will rest comfortably inside the shell. It is like holding a steering wheel.

F2C Pro 1600W Adjustable 7 Speed Handheld

The motor is 1600 watts, and it can be used to mix concrete, mortar and drywall muds. It does a wonderful job mixing without any setbacks.

There are two nitpicks that we have with this drill. Firstly, it is too loud. It it rather close to that of the noise created by DeWalt. Secondly, the drill is the heaviest of all the drills in the review, weighing at 12 pounds. These are not serious issues, but they can really take a damper on your experience if you are used to quieter and lighter drills.

Pros:

  • Is affordable.
  • Has a high RPM.
  • Has a variable speed control.
  • Is made specifically for mixing.
  • Has a high horsepower motor.

Cons:

  • Is a heavy drill.
  • Is very loud.

What to Know Before Buying A Drill for Mixing Mud?

There are multiple things that you have to consider when choosing the best mixing drill to suit your needs. The best results all depend on what type of paddle you need most for the substances that you are mixing up, but it is also important for the drill to work well, of course.

Mixing paddles are other things to shop for in order to effectively mix your materials with your drill. A mixing paddle is a tool that is used to mix or blend your materials. As you operate the drill, the paddle will spin hundreds of revolutions per minute at the other end. These paddles are designed to cut time and reduce effort, and can be used in mixing cement, mortar, paint and other materials. Other purposes of mixing paddles for mixing mud include removing lumps, thickening the substance, removing air bubbles from the mixture and more.

Mixing paddles come in various different shapes, and the material that is best blends will determine the shape of your paddle. Here are all the types of materials commonly mixed with a drill for mixing mud.

Drywall Mud

Drywall mud is used to form drywall; one of the most common kinds of materials for household walls. For mixing drywall, you will most likely need a paddle with holes in the middle of it, so that you can minimize scraping from around the bucket that is used for mixing.

Concrete

Concrete is used to make many different things, such as roads, walls and floors. There are many different paddles you can use for mixing concrete, but because gravel is also added to a concrete mix, you will need a paddle that is capable of mixing larger rocks effectively. The most common type of paddle used for concrete looks like an egg beater.
Mortar/Cement

Cement is stickier than concrete, and in fact, it is used as a substance in concrete as well. Cement is hardened when it is mixed with water. Mortar on the other hand is a mixture of cement and sand. When water is added to this mix, it will also harden. Mortar is not nearly as firm as concrete, though. You will likely need a square shaped paddle to mix either of these materials.

How To Use And Maintain The Mixing Drill – A Tradesman’s Guide

There are two kinds of fittings for mixing paddles. Therefore, you will need to know whether or not your drill is compatible with it and how fast the paddle needs to go in order to thoroughly mix the substance.

Paddles that have a hexagon-shaped shaft are used with drills that are fitted for that drill chuck. These mixing paddles need to be sued at speeds below 1000 RPM, but that is nothing to worry about, as none of these drills exceed 1000 RPM.

Depending on the size of the hexagonal shaft that the paddle has, it should fit in a key chuck that is ⅜, ½, and/or ⅝ inches in diameter. If your shaft is smaller than 11 millimeters, you will need a ⅜-inch chuck. If your shaft is smaller than 14 millimeters, you will need a ½-inch chuck. If your shaft is smaller than 17 millimeters, you will need a ⅝-inch chuck.

Have a measuring tool on hand to know the diameter of your shaft. Knowing the width of this shaft should determine the right chuck for you to use.

Once you have connected the paddle to your mixture in this way, prepare your mixture in a clean bucket or container. Once the material is poured in, stick the head of the paddle into the mix and drill. The paddle should spin and blend the mix. Continue to blend until the mixture is smooth and consistent enough.

Prerequisites To Using The Product Tips for Beginners

In order to mix with a drill for mixing muds, you will need the following.

  • A drill for mixing muds
  • A large bucket or container
  • Your material used for mixing
  • A mixing paddle
  • A key chuck (if paddle does not fit in your drill)
  • Some water
  • And an electrical source

Final Verdict:

After careful consideration, the best drill for mixing mud is the F2C Pro 1600W Adjustable 7 Speed Handheld.

This decision may not be what you expect, but since this drill is made specifically for mixing, it is a product that you will find much easier to use than a multi-purpose drill. It’s effective, comfortable to hold, and adjusting the speed is easy to do. If you own a drill, but aren’t used to mixing with one, you should look into this drill from F2C to help mix your muds.

But let’s say you are an experienced mixer that uses the typical drill, and you’d like a new one that can mix. If that is the case, we suggest the DeWalt or Bosch drills, as they are both amazing products that are not going to disappoint.

About the Author Allen A

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